Posts tagged with 'twitter'

Super fascinating analytics/stats from the first 24 hours of When Women Refuse

I started a Tumblr blog to collect stories of violence committed against women who refused men’s advances (full background story here), and 24 hours into this project, we’ve received some incredible sets of traffic and engagement numbers. Put your nerd pants on, kids, we’re going for a ride.

Site analytics

Audience_Overview_-_Google_Analytics

YOWZAH

Really don’t think I’ve ever participated in a project that got this sheer kind of volume right away.

Also notable is that the session duration is quite long– people are staying and reading.

Here’s our referral traffic:

Referral_Traffic_-_Google_Analytics

Twitter is the #1, by a long shot, but Jezebel and Think Progress combined send just about the same amount. Facebook (#4, #5 & #8) are pretty distant behind Twitter. Tumblr doesn’t make it into the top ten for direct referrals because Google Analytics treats each Tumblr blog as a separate site, but else in the Social Network analysis, it says around 5,000 hits have come from the Tumblr community, which would put them just above Feministing.

I like looking at how long users referred from different places stayed on site: Fusion and Think Progress folks stayed the longest out of the top ten, while Reddit users bounced pretty quickly (SHOCKING NO ONE, haha).

Also notable: almost no traffic is coming in from searches. No one’s searching for something and landing here by mistake.

Here’s our most popular content:

Pages_-_Google_Analytics

Just like with Planned Parenthood Saved Me: people wanted more once they scrolled through the first page. It helps that the theme we had for the first 24 hours automatically loaded the second page, so that may account for the high number for page 2. But, filed under Things That Never Happen on the Internet, 12.7% of the users made it to page 3 loading, which means they kept scrolling. I’m attributing this now to the sheer shock value of seeing so many stories, a seemingly endless supply.

A few Twitter stats

The first tweet mentioning the site was me at about 7pm ET on Monday, May 27. In the 24 hours that ensued, we saw 2,181 mentions of the site, which works out to be about 7.6 tweets per minute. (!)  In there, there were 2,030 unique people tweeting. HOLY SCHAMOLY.

A few Tumblr stats

Tumblr Again, I’ve never experienced that kind of explosive growth in following on Tumblr before.

A word about strategy

I’m a big fan of demystifying content that seemingly goes viral explodes, so that others can learn how to spread critical information in a moment like this. First, we had a highly emotional moment that crossed many social boundaries working for us, and a hashtag (#YesAllWomen, which had been used over a million times since Saturday) that was already super active. In many ways, all of the elements were in place. Second, we are providing what is for many shocking information, which automatically makes it easily shareable. Those two factors are worth a million Internet dollars when it comes to spread.

But second, I didn’t just create the Tumblr and post it to my Facebook/Twitter, hoping for the best. I reached out to people who were having these conversations in my network, and let them know it was happening. I asked directly for folks’ help in spreading the word. I’m lucky in that I’m connected to a lot of influential people– note, not necessarily people with a bazillion followers, but who are influential in moving their networks to action– which is why cultivating your relationships with digital tools is an ongoing necessity for social changers.

The other thing I did was reach out immediately for a support team to help me make it work, via the TechLady Mafia. 4 wondrous souls jumped right in, and having that kind of team is what makes a project both survivable (when it’s this kind of emotional content), sometimes fun (we had a singalong and many palette-cleansing gifs have been shared via email), and even more successful than one person could have imagined.

On “All In with Chris Hayes:” Social media and global uprisings

On Forbes.com: Why Asking What Adria Richards Could Have Done Differently Is The Wrong Question

If you’ve not been following along in the latest brouhaha concerning sexism and the tech industry, this week saw a monster of a flame war spring up around conduct at a tech conference. Many other terrific bloggers have summed up what’s been happening, but let me offer a set of bullet points and links to bring everyone up to speed…

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: The Social Media Secrets of Top Movement Leaders

Whenever I’m called in to provide the leaders of both public and private sectors training and guidance on using digital tools, I sometimes get a little bit of resistance. And that resistance almost always focuses on a single complaint:I just don’t have time for this. People in leadership positions are already juggling a million different roles and tasks, and I’m asking them to take on another that doesn’t, at first glance, feel like it has immediate return on time investment. In the nonprofit world especially, movement leaders experience intensive levels of stress, and social media doesn’t always seem to make sense in the scramble of trying to save the world.

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: Germany’s Problem with Women

Trouble’s brewing in Germany. No, it’s not the euro crisis; it’s the good kind of trouble: Feminism is finding new life in networked voices online. Last week, a German blogger named Maike Hank put out a simple, defiant call to end harassment and daily sexism with her post, “This Is Not Normal.”  It resonated deeply with many on Twitter, and people like Nicole von Horst  started sharing their own stories: “The doctor that patted my ass, as I lay in the hospital after an attempted suicide.” That’s when Anne Wizorek, founder of the blogkleinerdrei and digital media consultant (and, disclaimer, a very good friend of mine), recognized what was happening, and suggested a hashtag to capture the stories: #aufschrei (#outcry). And then all hell broke loose when an article came out in the magazine Stern stating that Rainer Brüderle, Germany’s minister for economics and technology, had allegedly sexually harassed a journalist.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

On Forbes.com: How to Use Rowfeeder to Track Social Media Conversations

At my latest digital-tools-for-social-good workshop in New York yesterday, everyone wanted to know the ins and outs of metrics and measurement. I interviewed social media metrics Beth Kanter recently, and that interview provides a great intro to the concepts of measurement. (I highly recommend her book, Measuring the Networked Nonprofit.) But, I also realized it might be useful to walk through setting up some simple measurements with a free/low-cost tool that I love,Rowfeeder.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

On Forbes.com: 3 Easy “Dream Measurements” That Twitter Could Give Us

There was a lot of chatter last week about Twitter changing the way it allows third parties to access its API, about the potential that it could change how followers are displayed, and that co-founder Ev Williams said at an event that the dream metric that everyone is actually looking for is “how many people saw your tweet.”

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

On Forbes.com: Your Brain on Social Networks: Are We Changing How We Perceive Major Events?

Yesterday afternoon in New York, and other cities across the Eastern seaboard, fierce thunderstorms hit. No major damage, not even widespread power outages, and yet the social media storm that accompanied the real ones leaned toward frenzied. I got caught up in it, too–live-tweeting the relatively mild conditions we experienced in south Brooklyn, and wondering about the emergency push alert I’d received for the first time on my mobile phone. Pictures of hail and scary looking clouds flew by, while many took the end-times feeling of the cloudburst to preach about the dangers of climate change. And then it was all over an hour later.

This summer’s early heat wave has felt like an anomaly, and certainly I’ve never seen pictures of storms around NYC like those that were shared over the course of the storm. And I’m wondering if that’s exactly the point: I can’t compare those pictures to pictures I remember as a kid, because I didn’t have Twitter when I was ten.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

On Forbes.com: A Challenge to Digital Influencers: Join The #One4One Game

Who would you name?

We all say we despise those lists that get created to showcase influencers and hotshots in our field. But secretly, (a) we wish we were on them, (b) they didn’t pick the same small group of people all the time, and (c) we all know that people love lists, or else we wouldn’t keep making them. So, how can we break out of ruts that naming-games create?

We’ll create a new game.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

On Forbes.com: What Not to Do When Everyone Is Watching on Social Media

You would think that social media as a journalistic and political tool would have gotten far enough into mainstream, regular use that we would collectively be avoiding glaring mistakes at this juncture. But no, all it takes is a major national event that all kinds of people would be paying attention to–like, say, the Supreme Court ruling on Obamacare, combined with our culture’s obsession with “first!“, and the power of Internet tools to capture the moment.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]