Posts tagged with 'technology'

On “All In with Chris Hayes:” Social media and global uprisings

On “All In with Chris Hayes:” Data vulnerability, privacy and general creepiness

The intro for this panel discussion can be found here.

Here are some of the articles I read while prepping for the segment:

On Forbes.com: Why Asking What Adria Richards Could Have Done Differently Is The Wrong Question

If you’ve not been following along in the latest brouhaha concerning sexism and the tech industry, this week saw a monster of a flame war spring up around conduct at a tech conference. Many other terrific bloggers have summed up what’s been happening, but let me offer a set of bullet points and links to bring everyone up to speed…

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: What Sandy Has Taught Us About Technology, Relief and Resilience

Nerds in the aftermath of Sandy sprang into action: We’ve seen some innovative technology solutions address many aspects of the fallout of the storm. It got me poking around at what’s working and what isn’t, and starting to look at communications solutions we can start to put in place before the next storm, disaster, revolution or what-have-you.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

“The avant-garde doesn’t need drugs anymore” — my appearance in DIE ZEIT

The Valise Society salon that my friend Tobias hosted for me in Berlin was covered by one of Germany’s largest weekly publications, DIE ZEIT, in their print publication. (I also spoke at their new online newsroom and had a Google hangout with them while I was in Berlin.) English translation follows.

[read the rest of this post » ]

I’ve been awarded a 2012 Maggie Award from Planned Parenthood

Deanna Zandt speaking at Planned Parenthood Organizing and Policy Summit 2012

That’s right! Me, who never wins anything! Planned Parenthood awards all kinds of designations each year, and for my work on Planned Parenthood Saved Me, they’ve given me their first-ever 2012 Social Media award. I’m honored!

Here are the remarks I shared at the award luncheon today:

First, thank you Planned Parenthood, not only for your health care and advocacy, but for championing women without fail, with what seems like without compromise. That’s rare in our political climate. Planned Parenthood has successfully negotiated that emotional connection we all feel to the work they do, whether that’s through their clinics or their advocacy, and turned it into a relationship. They’ve embraced social media, both their own properties and the wider world’s conversations.

But also, I’m sharing this award with all the women who shared their stories on Planned Parenthood Saved Me. It’s a crying shame that we live in a world where this is an act of bravery, but that’s what it was. The women that said, “I would have bled to death if it weren’t Planned Parenthood,” or “Planned Parenthood’s staff were the only people who understood me after I was assaulted,” or “Planned Parenthood found my cancer.” That’s what you do. That is your work, and we thank you.

Which is the last thing I want to share– I really want people to understand that PP Saved Me blew up not because Rachel Maddow read from it on her show, or that it was in the Washington Post and a dozen other major major outlets. More than half the traffic to the site came before any major media mention, and that traffic came from Facebook, Twitter & Tumblr.

Women sharing their stories with one another made the difference her. Our stories matter, more than ever.

If you want to learn more about how the Planned Parenthood Saved me campaign worked, check out this 10-minute talk I gave at Personal Democracy Forum: “Don’t Mess with Our Boobs: Ad-Hoc Networks and Online Power.

New Forbes post: Why Being Good Enough Is Never Enough on the Internet

There is no such thing as a pure meritocracy.

Every few months, it seems like, when the Internet gets its big knickers on and does something righteous, invariably, someone somewhere gets up on a stage and declares that anyone, if the idea is good enough, can be successful on the Internet. Whether that’s a business plan, a political campaign or a cultural meme: you, too, can make it big. It’s our American rugged individualism, intertwined with what looks like an open digital frontier, all packaged up into an utopian bliss for the new century.

What’s true is that more people than ever have access to information, tools and networks that make things happen. And while the news often covers the darker sides of connective technologies like the Internet and mobile devices becoming mainstream, there’s plenty of good to celebrate. Look at just this past week in Internet do-gooding: A video showing a school bus monitor being gut-wrenchingly harassed by 13-year-old boys until she cried sparked a fundraising campaign for her, one that’s now reached over $650,000.

Where things go awry in the analysis of these kinds of situations is two-fold: one, that there is a secret to making something “go viral” (short answer: there isn’t), and two, anyone can create explosive story at any time if the story has merit. If you’re good enough and smart enough, doggone it, people will like you. And you will win the Internet.

Read the rest over on Forbes.com.

Don’t Mess with Our Boobs: Ad-Hoc Networks and Online Power

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 Full text of this talk is available here.

On Forbes.com: How Internet Rage Is Making Tech Culture a Better Place

It was a banner weekend for gender-washing on the Internet. First up: anotherwise decent article in the New York Times on Ellen Pao’s discrimination suit — a lawsuit that’s threatening to shake up Silicon Valley bro culture, thankfully — started out by erasing women’s contributions to the birth of the Internet. “Men invented the Internet.” Line 1, paragraph 1. Men.

[Read the rest on Forbes.]

Two new workshops announced: New York City and Chicago!

I’m super excited to announce that the (very successful!) pilot of my Social Media for Social Justice workshop is expanding to two new locations in the coming weeks!

  • New York: May 24th, 1-5pm at Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 434 W. 33rd Street, (between 9th & 10th Aves), New York, NY 10001
  • Chicago: June 4th, 1-5pm at In These Times, 2040 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago IL 60647

Here’s what we’ll be covering:

You know about social media. You know that you’ve got to get on board with it for your organization, or for your own activist work. You may have even signed up for Twitter or Facebook already, but you don’t know where to start. What are the right tools to use? What do I say? Why are other people doing this? And, perhaps, most importantly: how the hell do I know if it’s working?!

In this introductory intensive workshop, we’ll cover everything from the culture and politics of social media (and why that’s critical to understand), to the essential elements of a social media strategy, to some tools to manage your presences efficiently, to metrics and analytics to keep you on track.

This workshop is designed for social media beginners who work with social justice movements, labor unions, community organizers, and media makers who want to know how and why to incorporate new tools into their practice.

If that sounds like what you need, use the links to the cities above to register. Group discounts and scholarships are available! And if you want to bring me to your town (or to your organization or event), just get in touch with Jen at Aid & Abet and we’ll work it out.