On “All In with Chris Hayes:” This is why Facebook has people worried

Quick hit: Social drives traffic to When Women Refuse

Similar to Planned Parenthood Saved Me, it appears that social media is the dominant driver of traffic to When Women Refuse. Sharing stories matters. Again.

Channels_-_Google_Analytics

Super fascinating analytics/stats from the first 24 hours of When Women Refuse

I started a Tumblr blog to collect stories of violence committed against women who refused men’s advances (full background story here), and 24 hours into this project, we’ve received some incredible sets of traffic and engagement numbers. Put your nerd pants on, kids, we’re going for a ride.

Site analytics

Audience_Overview_-_Google_Analytics

YOWZAH

Really don’t think I’ve ever participated in a project that got this sheer kind of volume right away.

Also notable is that the session duration is quite long– people are staying and reading.

Here’s our referral traffic:

Referral_Traffic_-_Google_Analytics

Twitter is the #1, by a long shot, but Jezebel and Think Progress combined send just about the same amount. Facebook (#4, #5 & #8) are pretty distant behind Twitter. Tumblr doesn’t make it into the top ten for direct referrals because Google Analytics treats each Tumblr blog as a separate site, but else in the Social Network analysis, it says around 5,000 hits have come from the Tumblr community, which would put them just above Feministing.

I like looking at how long users referred from different places stayed on site: Fusion and Think Progress folks stayed the longest out of the top ten, while Reddit users bounced pretty quickly (SHOCKING NO ONE, haha).

Also notable: almost no traffic is coming in from searches. No one’s searching for something and landing here by mistake.

Here’s our most popular content:

Pages_-_Google_Analytics

Just like with Planned Parenthood Saved Me: people wanted more once they scrolled through the first page. It helps that the theme we had for the first 24 hours automatically loaded the second page, so that may account for the high number for page 2. But, filed under Things That Never Happen on the Internet, 12.7% of the users made it to page 3 loading, which means they kept scrolling. I’m attributing this now to the sheer shock value of seeing so many stories, a seemingly endless supply.

A few Twitter stats

The first tweet mentioning the site was me at about 7pm ET on Monday, May 27. In the 24 hours that ensued, we saw 2,181 mentions of the site, which works out to be about 7.6 tweets per minute. (!)  In there, there were 2,030 unique people tweeting. HOLY SCHAMOLY.

A few Tumblr stats

Tumblr Again, I’ve never experienced that kind of explosive growth in following on Tumblr before.

A word about strategy

I’m a big fan of demystifying content that seemingly goes viral explodes, so that others can learn how to spread critical information in a moment like this. First, we had a highly emotional moment that crossed many social boundaries working for us, and a hashtag (#YesAllWomen, which had been used over a million times since Saturday) that was already super active. In many ways, all of the elements were in place. Second, we are providing what is for many shocking information, which automatically makes it easily shareable. Those two factors are worth a million Internet dollars when it comes to spread.

But second, I didn’t just create the Tumblr and post it to my Facebook/Twitter, hoping for the best. I reached out to people who were having these conversations in my network, and let them know it was happening. I asked directly for folks’ help in spreading the word. I’m lucky in that I’m connected to a lot of influential people– note, not necessarily people with a bazillion followers, but who are influential in moving their networks to action– which is why cultivating your relationships with digital tools is an ongoing necessity for social changers.

The other thing I did was reach out immediately for a support team to help me make it work, via the TechLady Mafia. 4 wondrous souls jumped right in, and having that kind of team is what makes a project both survivable (when it’s this kind of emotional content), sometimes fun (we had a singalong and many palette-cleansing gifs have been shared via email), and even more successful than one person could have imagined.

What you don’t know about Eliot Rodger and the CA shootings might kill you. And all of us.

So many powerful pieces to cover in the wake of the horrifying shootings in Santa Barbara on Friday night–to me, the most critical issue here is not to call this event a lone-gunman kind of tragedy, but rather the shocking result of a blend of cultures that glorify both violence and a horrendous version of American masculinity that is impossible for men and people on the masculine spectrum to uphold. They are breaking apart–not because feminism is pulling them down, but because our collective cultural response to a feminist worldview that celebrates all genders is to blame things like this on the “feminizing” of our culture.

I ache, deeply, for a world where men, boys and masculine folk are released from the cultural constructs that are tearing them up, as much as I wish the same for women, girls, feminine and androgynous folk. Elevating the status of women is not a zero-sum game: everyone does better, when everyone does better, as Jim Hightower’s dad has said.

Now, your required reading:

On “All In with Chris Hayes:” Social media and global uprisings

On “All In with Chris Hayes:” Data vulnerability, privacy and general creepiness

The intro for this panel discussion can be found here.

Here are some of the articles I read while prepping for the segment:

On Forbes.com: How Event Organizers Can Make Sure Their Events Rock Every Single Time

“We’d love to have you speak at our event, but we can’t pay an honorarium and are unable to cover our speakers’ travel.”

“We’d love to have you attend the event in [another city across the country] and contribute to the growth of our community, but we’re not able to pay for travel for [attendees/speakers/anyone]. We will, however, be serving [insert 1 or 2 meals] each day.

These are invitations I’ve received from various industry events around the country. Not paying for varying degrees of participation is standard practice for most event planning committees–and it’s a practice that’s doing a serious disservice to communities and hurting business and organizational objectives.

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: 3 Things I Wish I’d Known About Writing a Book

If you’re an independent consultant, entrepreneur, or an expert in your field, you’ve probably heard it: Writing a book is one of the best things you can do to level up your career. And, as a media consultant who wrote a book on social media three years ago, I can tell you that’s absolutely true.

But I can also tell you that it isn’t easy, and not just for the creative reasons that come to mind—squeezing out all of your literary juices onto the page and having them whipped into compelling shape is only just the beginning

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: Why Asking What Adria Richards Could Have Done Differently Is The Wrong Question

If you’ve not been following along in the latest brouhaha concerning sexism and the tech industry, this week saw a monster of a flame war spring up around conduct at a tech conference. Many other terrific bloggers have summed up what’s been happening, but let me offer a set of bullet points and links to bring everyone up to speed…

[Read the rest on Forbes]

On Forbes.com: The Social Media Secrets of Top Movement Leaders

Whenever I’m called in to provide the leaders of both public and private sectors training and guidance on using digital tools, I sometimes get a little bit of resistance. And that resistance almost always focuses on a single complaint:I just don’t have time for this. People in leadership positions are already juggling a million different roles and tasks, and I’m asking them to take on another that doesn’t, at first glance, feel like it has immediate return on time investment. In the nonprofit world especially, movement leaders experience intensive levels of stress, and social media doesn’t always seem to make sense in the scramble of trying to save the world.

[Read the rest on Forbes]